Could antioxidants be bad?

After all these years of hearing the wonderful benefits of antioxidants from anti-aging boosters to cancer fighting warriors, could we have gotten it wrong? What if too much of a good thing is actually bad?

New research is questioning just that: if we are over doing it with antioxidants, and whether they are blocking the natural defenses of free radicals.

Yep, you heard it- could free radicles actually be good for us?

 

So what is a free radical?

When we eat food it is broken down and energy (ATP) is manufactured within the mitochondria of a cell. But in the conversion of food to energy, oxygen is required, and this is referred to as an‘ oxidation process’ where free radicals are produced.

 

And what do we know about antioxidants?

There are 3 main categories of antioxidants- enzymic antioxidants, which are those our own body produces. Vitamin derived antioxidants, which are those found in Vitamin C, E, and A, and Phytochemical type antioxidants that are produced by plants in order to protect themselves from damage or harm from UV sunrays, insects, fungi or bacteria, such as the tannins in tea and resveratrol in red grape skins.

 

But according to Nobel Prize winning geneticist James Watson, it is these same #antioxidants that are actually causing some cancers, and shortening the life span of cancer sufferers. That in cancer, it is free radicals or oxidation that is desired and which are responsible for most cancer cells being destroyed.

 

While in the well-respected science Journal of Physiology, it was found that with the addition of the antioxidant, resveratrol in supplemental form to ‘aged men’; it physically blocked the positive health impacts that exercise had on their heart, blood pressure, cholesterol and oxygen uptake.

 

So, what’s the conclusion? Are antioxidants good or bad? Are free radicals in fact the newest discovery in the natural arsenal for fighting cancer?

The evidence is still pointing towards the benefits of eating a diet rich in antioxidant foods found naturally in fruits, vegetables, grains, herbs and spices. That perhaps we are over-doing it on the supplement versions of antioxidants, and this is where issues are arising.

Visit Honor on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and her blog www.nutritionsciencewellness.com

 

 

 

 

 

#Anti #ageing Secrets from Around the World

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 What is ageing? Can anything slow it down?

Ageing is basically defined as a cells gradual decline in function and number of pre-programmed cell divisions until it reaches the point of ‘cell destruction’ and death.

Can anything help keep our cells behaving and looking younger?

Yes! Let’s look at some anti ageing practices from around the globe.

 

 

  • Dry Brushing.

US Dr. and Naturopath- Bernard Jensen made it famous when he discovered how beneficial it was to his patients. It is considered the most efficient form of exfoliating, tones & tightens the skin and body, skin look younger and firmer, reduces fluid retention, decreases cellulite, and you feel great!

  • Green and black tea:

Researches questioned why people in Japan were some of the youngest looking for their age, as well as having the lowest rates of cancer in the world, and they found the powerful antioxidants within green and black tea were why.

  • Sleep:

The department of neuroscience at Uppsala University in Sweden discovered that not only does adequate sleep make us more physically attractive to others; it also keeps our body weight lower & keeps us healthier in general.

  • Cold shower therapy:

Used throughout Europe and the Mediterranean, cold shower therapy helps circulation, tightens your body and skin, increases skin radiance, and increases energy and mood.

  • Turmeric:

Helps with weight loss & obesity.

Physically stops a cell from ageing after sun or free radical exposure by stopping collagen breakdown.

And even protects the brain from developing Alzheimer’s disease by preventing beta-amyloid plaque build up there.

 

To find out lots more, follow Honor on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and at www.honortremain.com.au

 

Never have another bad day 

  I am very lucky in my work.

I once met and looked after the very charismatic and inspiring doctors- Dr. Patch Adams, who was made famous by the movie of the same name starring Robin Williams, and Australian clown doctor, the late Peter Spitzer, while in Sydney for an international health summit.

 

Patch’s concepts on health and depression are: that none of us ever need to live another bad or unhappy day- ever!

 

The secret to this is to look for and find the joy in your life, and celebrate it right now. Ever day, find something to be happy about, grateful for, to laugh at, that you find ridiculous no matter how big or small it may be.

These men are what inspired the beginning of my “thankful Thursday,” a regular Thursday post on social media dedicated to what I’m grateful for, as I believe this spreads, like a smile, to hopefully effect others to reflect on the good in their own lives.

 

Focusing on the positives is key not only to bringing vitality, happiness and joy to your life right now, but long term this benefits your health on may levels from boosting immune cells to fight off illness, to helping us age with less wrinkles (apparently).

 

Due to Patch and Peter’s work, there are now ‘clown units’ or ‘clowning programs’ in hospitals all over the world where it is being medically viewed that laughter and happiness can boost a patient’s recovery and response to illness.

 

It’s so easy to look at the all negative around us, or the imperfections in our own life, keeping our focus on sadness.

Feeling sad makes us physically more prone to some infections and illnesses.

 

“If you’ve got food and a friend, what are you crying about?” Patch asks. He believes that depression and feeling down is somewhat a choice, a selfish choice. Now this may ruffle some feathers, but is it not true that when we forget to be depressed and lose ourselves in an exhilarating or unexpected joyous moment- we feel better?

 

Find Honor on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and on www.honortremain.com.au

 

 

 

 

Science is Seeing the Value of Mindfulness in Breaking a Habit

#Mindfulness has been spoken of in many spiritual and #wellness circles for decades, from #Buddhism to some forms of #Christianity, to the latest wellness guru’s.

But only now is the #science world also confirming it’s powerful effects in your life!

Read this script from Judson Brewer on TED talks,

“When I was first learning to meditate, the instruction was to simply pay attention to my breath, and when my mind wandered, to bring it back.

00:19

Sounded simple enough. Yet I’d sit on these silent retreats, sweating through T-shirts in the middle of winter. I’d take naps every chance I got because it was really hard work. Actually, it was exhausting. The instruction was simple enough but I was missing something really important.

00:39

So why is it so hard to pay attention? Well, studies show that even when we’re really trying to pay attention to something — like maybe this talk — at some point, about half of us will drift off into a daydream, or have this urge to check our Twitter feed.

00:55

So what’s going on here? It turns out that we’re fighting one of the most evolutionarily-conserved learning processes currently known in science, one that’s conserved back to the most basic nervous systems known to man.

01:08

This reward-based learning process is called positive and negative reinforcement, and basically goes like this. We see some food that looks good, our brain says, “Calories! … Survival!” We eat the food, we taste it — it tastes good. And especially with sugar, our bodies send a signal to our brain that says, “Remember what you’re eating and where you found it.” We lay down this context-dependent memory and learn to repeat the process next time. See food, eat food, feel good, repeat. Trigger, behavior, reward.

01:42

Simple, right? Well, after a while, our creative brains say, “You know what? You can use this for more than just remembering where food is. You know, next time you feel bad, why don’t you try eating something good so you’ll feel better?” We thank our brains for the great idea, try this and quickly learn that if we eat chocolate or ice cream when we’re mad or sad, we feel better.

02:07

Same process, just a different trigger. Instead of this hunger signal coming from our stomach, this emotional signal — feeling sad — triggers that urge to eat.

02:18

Maybe in our teenage years, we were a nerd at school, and we see those rebel kids outside smoking and we think, “Hey, I want to be cool.” So we start smoking. The Marlboro Man wasn’t a dork, and that was no accident. See cool, smoke to be cool, feel good. Repeat. Trigger, behavior, reward. And each time we do this, we learn to repeat the process and it becomes a habit. So later, feeling stressed out triggers that urge to smoke a cigarette or to eat something sweet.

02:52

Now, with these same brain processes, we’ve gone from learning to survive to literally killing ourselves with these habits. Obesity and smoking are among the leading preventable causes of morbidity and mortality in the world.

03:06

So back to my breath. What if instead of fighting our brains, or trying to force ourselves to pay attention, we instead tapped into this natural, reward-based learning process … but added a twist? What if instead we just got really curious about what was happening in our momentary experience?

03:24

I’ll give you an example. In my lab, we studied whether mindfulness training could help people quit smoking. Now, just like trying to force myself to pay attention to my breath, they could try to force themselves to quit smoking. And the majority of them had tried this before and failed — on average, six times.

03:42

Now, with mindfulness training, we dropped the bit about forcing and instead focused on being curious. In fact, we even told them to smoke. What? Yeah, we said, “Go ahead and smoke, just be really curious about what it’s like when you do.”

03:57

And what did they notice? Well here’s an example from one of our smokers. She said, “Mindful smoking: smells like stinky cheese and tastes like chemicals, YUCK!” Now, she knew, cognitively that smoking was bad for her, that’s why she joined our program. What she discovered just by being curiously aware when she smoked was that smoking tastes like shit.

04:22

(Laughter)

04:25

Now, she moved from knowledge to wisdom. She moved from knowing in her head that smoking was bad for her to knowing it in her bones, and the spell of smoking was broken. She started to become disenchanted with her behavior.

04:41

Now, the prefrontal cortex, that youngest part of our brain from an evolutionary perspective, it understands on an intellectual level that we shouldn’t smoke. And it tries it’s hardest to help us change our behavior, to help us stop smoking, to help us stop eating that second, that third, that fourth cookie. We call this cognitive control. We’re using cognition to control our behavior. Unfortunately, this is also the first part of our brain that goes offline when we get stressed out, which isn’t that helpful.

05:13

Now, we can all relate to this in our own experience. We’re much more likely to do things like yell at our spouse or kids when we’re stressed out or tired, even though we know it’s not going to be helpful. We just can’t help ourselves.

05:26

When the prefrontal cortex goes offline, we fall back into our old habits, which is why this disenchantment is so important. Seeing what we get from our habits helps us understand them at a deeper level — to know it in our bones so we don’t have to force ourselves to hold back or restrain ourselves from behavior. We’re just less interested in doing it in the first place.

05:45

And this is what mindfulness is all about: Seeing really clearly what we get when we get caught up in our behaviors, becoming disenchanted on a visceral level and from this disenchanted stance, naturally letting go.

05:59

This isn’t to say that, poof, magically we quit smoking. But over time, as we learn to see more and more clearly the results of our actions, we let go of old habits and form new ones.

06:11

The paradox here is that mindfulness is just about being really interested in getting close and personal with what’s actually happening in our bodies and minds from moment to moment. This willingness to turn toward our experience rather than trying to make unpleasant cravings go away as quickly as possible. And this willingness to turn toward our experience is supported by curiosity, which is naturally rewarding.

06:34

What does curiosity feel like? It feels good. And what happens when we get curious? We start to notice that cravings are simply made up of body sensations — oh, there’s tightness, there’s tension, there’s restlessness — and that these body sensations come and go. These are bite-size pieces of experiences that we can manage from moment to moment rather than getting clobbered by this huge, scary craving that we choke on.

07:01

In other words, when we get curious, we step out of our old, fear-based, reactive habit patterns, and we step into being. We become this inner scientist where we’re eagerly awaiting that next data point.

07:17

Now, this might sound too simplistic to affect behavior. But in one study, we found that mindfulness training was twice as good as gold standard therapy at helping people quit smoking. So it actually works.

07:30

And when we studied the brains of experienced meditators, we found that parts of a neural network of self-referential processing called the default mode network were at play. Now, one current hypothesis is that a region of this network, called the posterior cingulate cortex, is activated not necessarily by craving itself but when we get caught up in it, when we get sucked in, and it takes us for a ride.

07:52

In contrast, when we let go — step out of the process just by being curiously aware of what’s happening — this same brain region quiets down.

08:02

Now we’re testing app and online-based mindfulness training programs that target these core mechanisms and, ironically, use the same technology that’s driving us to distraction to help us step out of our unhealthy habit patterns of smoking, of stress eating and other addictive behaviors.

08:20

Now, remember that bit about context-dependent memory? We can deliver these tools to peoples’ fingertips in the contexts that matter most. So we can help them tap into their inherent capacity to be curiously aware right when that urge to smoke or stress eat or whatever arises.

08:37

So if you don’t smoke or stress eat, maybe the next time you feel this urge to check your email when you’re bored, or you’re trying to distract yourself from work, or maybe to compulsively respond to that text message when you’re driving, see if you can tap into this natural capacity, just be curiously aware of what’s happening in your body and mind in that moment. It will just be another chance to perpetuate one of our endless and exhaustive habit loops … or step out of it.

09:05

Instead of see text message, compulsively text back, feel a little bit better — notice the urge, get curious, feel the joy of letting go and repeat.

09:16

Thank you”.

09:17

(Applause)

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/judson_brewer_a_simple_way_to_break_a_bad_habit

What’s Cereal Doing To Your Childs Behavior?

It’s back to school time around Queensland this week, and so we are all back in the quagmire of routine, packing lunches, prepping dinners, rapidly brushing teeth and hair right after chugging down breakfast.

But in our quest to make school drop off, work and start our day on time, whilst eating what we believe to be healthy, what are we actually feeding our children for breakfast?

 

Many of our most loved children’s breakfast cereals, that are advertised as either being healthy or great for athletes can be more than “one third sugar” states the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC)!

Now, that’s a lot of sugar for a small child to be consuming at the start of the day!

How do we expect them to concentrate on school, be calm, responsive and cooperative in the classroom, pay attention and not be fatigued by 930am when that sugar low comes crashing upon them?

 

“The Australian cereal manufacturers are potentially misleading consumers by promoting healthy sounding statements on their packaging despite sugar making up more than 35% of the ingredients of some popular brands, a recent survey has revealed” says the OPC.

 

Jane Martin, Executive Manager of the OPC says that many breakfast cereals contain excessive levels of sugar, but when designing labels, manufacturers use creative phrases to persuade consumers to believe they are making a nutritious choice for breakfast.

 

“Many parents would be horrified to learn that for every three mouthfuls of Nutri-Grain, one is just sugar, while a small bowl contains twice as much sodium as a small packet of chips” Ms. Martin adds.

 

To find out more, follow Honor on Instgram or Facebook.

 

Next weeks article will be on how to prepare healthy meals for children.

 

Coconut Cinnamon Breakfast Bowl

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-1/4 cup chia seeds

-3/4 cup, filtered water

-1 cup coconut cream

-1 tbs. raw organic honey

-1/2 tsp. cinnamon

-1 tsp. raw cacao

 

In a medium bowl place the chia seeds and water, stir and allow to set for 10 minutes, then add all other ingredients and blend with blender such as a Vitamix or hand held stick blender.

 

Cover with cling wrap and place in fridge until set. (6-8 hours)

 

Then top with options of:

-Banana sliced

-Sunflower seeds

-Coconut pieces

-Chia seeds

-Goji berries

-Sliced kiwi fruit

-Raw cacao nibs

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Cereal Doing To Your Child?

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What’s #Cereal Doing To Your #Child?

It’s back to school time around Queensland this week, and so we are all back in the quagmire of routine, packing lunches, prepping dinners, rapidly brushing teeth and hair right after chugging down breakfast.

But in our quest to make school drop off, work and start our day on time, whilst eating what we believe to be healthy, what are we actually feeding our children for breakfast?

 

Many of our most loved children’s breakfast cereals, many of which are advertised as either being healthy or great for athletes can be more than “one third sugar” states the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC)! Now, that’s a lot of #sugar for a small child to be consuming at the start of the day! How do we expect them to concentrate on school, be calm, responsive and cooperative in the classroom, pay attention and not be fatigued by 930am when that sugar low comes crashing upon them?

 

“The Australian cereal manufacturers are potentially misleading consumers by promoting healthy sounding statements on their packaging despite sugar making up more than 35% of the ingredients of some popular brands, a recent survey has revealed” says the OPC.

 

Jane Martin, Executive Manager of the OPC says that many breakfast cereals contain excessive levels of sugar, but when designing labels, manufacturers use creative phrases to persuade consumers to believe they are making a nutritious choice for breakfast.

 

“Many parents would be horrified to learn that for every three mouthfuls of Nutri-Grain, one is just sugar, while a small bowl contains twice as much sodium as a small packet of chips” Ms. Martin adds.

 

To find out more, follow Honor on Instgram or Facebook.

 

Next weeks article will be on how to prepare healthy meals for children.

 

Cereal offenders – What’s hiding in your cereal? Find out more:

 

http://www.opc.org.au/latestnews/mediareleases/pages/breakfast-cereals-up-to-one-third-sugar.aspx#.VqcNweknXFJ

#Vegan Pasta with Garlic #Kale

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Pasta sauce

-2 cups tomato pasta base sauce

-1 red onion, diced

-1 garlic clove, crushed

-1/4 cup fried tempeh, cubed

-1/4 cup cooked lentil, quinoa mix

-A dash of balsamic vinegar

-1/4 cup parsley, chopped

-1 tbs. olive oil

-Salt and pepper to taste

 

In a small to medium saucepan, heat the oil and sauté the onions and garlic, then adding in the tempeh. Stir until all golden brown.

Add tomato paste and all other ingredients, but not the vinegar. Place lid on, bring to boil, then stir, reduce to a low simmer, add balsamic, stir and simmer on low for 10-15 minutes.

 

 

Garlic Kale

-1 bunch rinsed kale, sliced

-2 cloves garlic, crushed

-Green olives, sliced

-2 tbs. Extra virgin, cold pressed Olive oil

-1/2- 1 tbs. apple cider or balsamic vinegar

-Salt to taste

 

In a small bowl put together 1 crushed garlic clove, apple cider vinegar and 1 tbs. olive oil. Put to the side.

In a small saucepan, use the other tbs. of oil with 1 clove of garlic, and salt.

Place on a medium heat and place the kale in, keep turning so kale doesn’t burn.

Keep tossing until slightly cooked through.

Remove from heat, place in bowl and drizzle with vinegar, oil mix and serve.

Add more salt if needed.

 

Serve pasta sauce over garlic kale and enjoy!

 

 

Raw Cacao Chia Pudding

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  • Gluten free, Dairy free, egg free, soy free, vegan.
  • Base Ingredients:
  • -1/4 cup chia grain
  • -3/4 cup filtered water, add and stir straight away, so no clumps form.
  • -1 ¼ cup organic coconut cream
  • -1/4 cup raw cacao powder
  • -1/4 cup of agave nectar, maple syrup or coconut syrup.
  • Instructions:
  • -Pour water over chia seeds in a glass or porcelain bowl, stir and soak for 15 minutes for best results.
  • -Add coconut cream, stir. Then agave and mix, the cacao and mix.
  • -Blend all ingredients thoroughly with bar mix or blender.
  • -Place pudding mix in a container, or bowl and in fridge until cold.
  • -Serve and enjoy!